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How Finland Reduced Our Gas Consumption Part 2

How Finland Reduced Our Gas Consumption Part 2

If you missed Part 1, you can read it here How Finland Reduced Our Gas Consumption Part 1.

We limped on through Finland very mindful by now of our dwindling gas levels.  Anything and everything possible is being considered to make this last bottle see out the distance.  We just hope we don’t run out of gas before we run out of country.  Then there’s the looming thought of it’s getting colder and before long we may need heating (another gas guzzler).

One thing that helped to extend our gas consumption was a pre-planned, albeit quick, trip to St Petersburg, Russia for three days.  Betsy, however, still has to use gas to keep the freezer cold (we can’t bring ourselves to spend another €8 per night to be plugged into electricity while we’re away).   This does take some pressure off the gas consumption somewhat and as you will see below, every bit helps.

We leave Helsinki and head north.  The first stop about an hours drive is a place called Hyvinkaa where we located a business called Best Caravans.  Not only do they have caravans, but they also have the best, and I mean the best, free camping spot that we have ever come across, bar none.  Yes they have electricity (phew) and they also provide a washing machine, a dryer (rare to find this), a double shower (nice) and then, wait for it… they offer a sauna!  All this for free (provided you buy something in their shop and/or secure their loyalty card).  So after buying some toilet tabs, which are always needed, we take advantage of these facilities while plugging in to give our fridge a much needed break from sucking on the gas.

Whenever we are plugged in the kettle goes away and the electric jug comes out.  I prefer this as electric is much quicker (especially when in urgent need of a quick cuppa).

We venture further north and planned our route around two more Best Caravan franchises.  Neither, however, as fruitful as the first, but that’s okay because it’s electricity we’re mainly looking for and were incredibly thankful for.

We found a LPG supplier reasonably close to the Finland border in Sweden.  Alan phoned to ensure our information was accurate and that they did, in fact, have LPG.  They did.

So the original plan was to drive from Oulu to Sweden, get the gas, then back into Finland and up to Rovaniemi to see Santa.  That plan changed to driving to Rovaniemi first, then across into Sweden, back into Finland and head north.

In the end we drove to Rovaniemi from Oulu, thankful as we saw the Aurora Borealis for the first time ever (so exciting!), then decided that we could possibly make a run for Norway and drive all the way over to Tromso for LPG.

By now the second tank is oh so low and I’m sure we’re sucking fumes.  We have reduced the number of hot drinks we consume and look for meze type food for dinner.   So cheese on crackers with salami and relish, anything that doesn’t need gas becomes our dinner.  If we do choose to a warm dinner we make sure it’s using one pot that is watched carefully.

We never skip a nightly shower that is until now.  With gas levels at a critically low level, we opt to skip a night due to prioritisation, a cuppa is more important than smelling good.  We reduced our timed water heating to 15 minutes which was ample providing it wasn’t a hair washing night.

The temperature is due to drop like a lead balloon to just two degrees tomorrow night.  I’m keen to drive through to Tromsø in one go, but it’s over six hours.  When we are used to one or two hours at a stretch, a six-hour drive is a far cry for us to consider.  I reluctantly resign to one further night in Finland and think about all the clothes I can wear in bed to stay warm tonight.    Thankfully the heater in Betsy is very good, so it gets turned on in short bursts just to take the chill out of the air and assist with sleeping.

We park tonight at a layby and notice, surprisingly, there are several other motorhomes and some caravans parked here too.  All through northern Finland we seem to have been on our own at overnight stops, but not tonight.  I brave the bone-biting cold wind and knock on the doors of other travelers inviting them to come over later for a drink and chat.  I’m hoping the distraction will get my mind off the lack of gas and more bodies inside Betsy will help to keep the warmth in.

The other motorhomers must have wondered who this was knocking on their door on dusk.  Dressed in all the warm clothes I could find, hat covering the blonde hair, and a scarf wrapped around my neck to fight off that bitter cold, I brave my fear of shyness and knock away.  Most occupants open their doors, and some speak English.  I get some polite no thank you declines, some who don’t speak English soon shut their doors to Mrs Blobby, and those who do engage in conversation are delighted at the invitation and agree to valiantly brave the cold and come across after dinner.

My plan worked, we have a lovely evening meeting new and interesting people and listen to their travel tales.  The night passes quickly and the temperature inside Betsy is cozy (without the need for any gas, whoops, I mean heating).

Once the evening congregation is finished, we say goodbye to our new friends and jump into bed to stay warm.  The heater goes on briefly and we hope we are well insulated from the jaw-dropping thermometer-dropping temperatures outside.  It works.

The next day we make a run to Tromsø and oh boy are we blessed with the most glorious day.  That’s a post for another time, needless to say we arrived safe and sound, filled up with that beautiful and most precious juice, LPG, and were on our way to great food and warmth inside Betsy.

So how long did we stretch bottle number two?  Well, that’s a good question.

Let me step back to the beginning of having two fill tanks of LPG, sourced from Sweden on 7th August.  We crossed into Finland later that day and didn’t fill up again until we were in Norway on 17th September.  So that gives us a staggering 41 days of gas consumption.

The first bottle was empty by the time we left the Awesome Åland Islands on 19th August (so that bottle lasted 12 days).  Therefore we stretched, and I mean stretched thin, the second bottle to a staggering 29 days.  HOW COOL IS THAT???  Just don’t ask me to do that again, especially when the weather starts to turn cold and we are in the north of Scandinavia.

Looking back now I would not, for the life of me, have skipped Finland just due to their lack of LPG.  (I do have to ask, however, Finland why don’t you have LPG?).  Finland offers so much to see and do and it even gave us challenges that looking back now, were fun.

So if you have LPG and have discounted traveling to this part of the world because of a lack of LPG then take a leaf out of our book, put on your big boy/girl pants and grunt up.  Making our gas last for 41 days is epic and if we can do it, then so can you.  I’m throwing down the gauntlet and want you to beat our record.  I dare you….

 

Awesome Åland Islands

Awesome Åland Islands

by Ruth Murdoch  |  August 2018  | Location Åland Islands, Finland

Barking dogs, loud parties and fast trains are things you won’t hear in the Åland Island.  Particularly when you arrive on the back of their “three-week” summer high season.

Getting to the Åland Islands

While staying with fellow motorhoming friends in Sweden, whom we had met in Greece in January 2018, we were advised to head over to Finland via the Åland Islands.  We checked out the cost difference and worked out that it was a better deal and an opportunity not to miss, especially as we had plenty of time. The cost of traveling by ferry from Stockholm (Sweden) to Turku (Finland) was €321 during the day and €351 for an evening sail (8pm – 7am) including a cabin.  We spent €65 from Grisslehamn (Sweden) to Eckero (the first main Island of the Ålands) and then €94.50 for all the ferries within and across the Åland Islands to Turku.  This price included a 10% discount for booking online for two people and one 7.5 metre long motorhome.  Here’s the link; www.alandstrafiken.ax/. So comparing our actual journey which cost us €159.50 to the more direct route of €321, we saved ourselves €161.50 and visited this wonderful area over twelve glorious sun-baked days. It is interesting to note that once you are inside the Åland Islands the ferries are all free, however, they do ask that you book in advance, especially in the high season (July).  We booked and didn’t have any trouble, although we did see other motorhomes being turned away when the ferry was full (in August).  The ferries reserve 17 metres only for motorhomes (ie two at any one time), hence the need to book ahead.

The Åland Islands are a popular tourist destination for the Finnish people during their summer break and we met quite a few during our travels.  Here was our schedule 7/8/18     Grisslehamn to Eckero (1.5-hour ferry ride)

12/8/18   Hummelvik to Kumlinge

14/8/18   Kumlinge to Lappo 16/8/18   Lappo to Torsholma

19/2/18   Ava to Osnas

Aside from the ferries above that typically take less than an hour per journey, the other islands we visited are connected via either bridges, causeways, or by cable ferries.  We lost count of the number of islands we actually set foot onto but believe it to be in the region of thirty or so.  Once we arrived in Osnas it was a short ferry ride (free of charge) to arrive onto mainland Finland where we stayed at the small settlement of Kustavi.

Ferry from Sweden to Åland Islands

Besty is Last on Board

About the Åland Islands

Åland is a Swedish-speaking, autonomous province in Finland and has its own flag.  Its population boasts 30,000 people with around 11,000 living in Åland’s only town, Mariehamn. There are 16 municipalities of the Åland Islands, an archipelago made up of 6,700 named islands and over 20,000 unnamed.  Whilst the islands are Finnish owned, the language spoken is Swedish and the currency is Euros.

The pace of life here is typical of island life.  Cars meander at their own rather slow pace rather than forging ahead at anywhere near the suggested speed limit.  No-one is in a rush, possibly because there are not many places to rush off to.  To come to the Ålands is to slow down and breathe. I want or rather need a haircut and expect there will only be one hair salon on the island and I would be able to get an appointment quickly.  Oh, how wrong was I?  There isn’t one, two or even three salons in Mariehamn there are eight!  What’s more, they are all fully booked until next week (it’s only Thursday).  We are told the summer rush is over and tourists have already left to get their children ready to start school again next week after the six week mid-summer holidays.  Hmmm, obviously the locals like to look well groomed around here.

The Economy

Driving around we wondered what the mainstay or their economy is.  There are apple trees in abundance, possibly more than is necessary for local consumption.  Then there are tourists.  The numbers swell from 11,000 in the winter to three times that number in the summer.  Surrounded by water, one has to think fish would play a part in the Åland Islands exports.  Apparently, timber is also up there.  Granite replaces grass in people’s backyards and we see paddocks of granite rock where one would expect to see crops or livestock.  The few white cows and a handful of shaggy Highland cattle we saw hardly constitute a dairy industry however, there was a lot of Aland Island milk and cheese on sale so there must be some decent sized herds somewhere.

The Aland Islands are one of the few places in the world where the honey industry is still free of the varroa mite, a fact which a local producer  (apiarist) was very proud of. The Aland honey is apparently a very prized and valuable export product.

Winters are obviously harsh here and the barns which shelter the livestock animals over the cold winter months sport chimneys.  The barns are built half from double layered stone insulated for housing the animals in winter and half from timber for the storing hay to feed the animals.

Notice The Two Building Materials

This Barn Has Seen Better Days

The Churches

In every small settlement stands a church proud and tall.  Visitors are welcome and a brochure in English explains the colourful history of each one.  We unfortunately just missed the opening season for the Kumlinge church which is renowned for its unique wall paintings from the 15th century.

In common with many other churches around the coastal regions of Scandinavia, there were one or more models of ships hanging from the ceiling.  These are ‘votive gifts’, were given to the church by sailors who had been caught up in some peril at sea and who had vowed to offer the ship if God delivered them home safely.

Kumlinge Church

Geta Church

Eckero Church Model Ship

Geta Church Model Ship

Our first night had us stopping in a very large and thankfully flat parking area outside the church just five minutes from where the ferry landed us at Eckero.  In the morning, after Alan checked with the groundsman that it was okay to use the water from the cemetery tap, the opportunity to get our clothes and sheets washed was too good to resist.  Deciding this was one of those times to ask for forgiveness rather than permission, Betsy was manoeuvred into a discrete location with the intention of minimising offence to anyone who might not like the sight of our dangling washing. The glorious sun had followed us from Sweden and combined with the wind, our clothes were dry in record time.

That afternoon we drove to the only town, Mariehamn to take a look around.  The tourist information was open and the lady there was very helpful.  With map in hand and points of interest noted, we headed off.  We drove to Lemland and checked out our planned overnight stop which was also a local swimming spot.  By this stage it was getting later in the day and I wasn’t so tempted to get cold.  Alan braved the late afternoon sun and at 8pm dove into the brackish waters.    Not to be out-done I swam the following morning when the sun was warmer and we enjoyed having this spot to ourselves before more visitors arrived.

Stunning Swimming Spot Near Lemland

The next day we drove to up past Geta north to the island of Dano and stayed beside the road for the night.  There were not many options here but thankfully the road was a dead end so we only had one car an hour drive past us.  One of these was the same car, so obviously a local.

 

The Maritime Museum

The maritime museum was calling our name, so back we headed to Mariehamn for some culture and education.  The cost of €10 each for entry was reasonable when you consider how good the displays were.  The Åland Islands have an vast nautical history This museum showcases the importance the sea had on life from yesteryear. We learnt about the genuine pirate flag.  Apparently, there are only two authentic skull and crossbones flags known in the world.  It is about 200 years old and came to the Ålands from North Africa’s Mediterranean coast where piracy existed well into the 1800s.  It used to be black but has been faded by weather and time.  The museum also tells the story of Wihelmina “Mimmi” Widbom, a rare female professional sailor who rounded Cape Horn eight times and was even torpedoed once in her long career.

Godby was next on our itinerary which once again provided a great swimming spot.  Alan found this by scrolling around on Google Maps looking for somewhere near the water and big enough to park Betsy.

Calm Day for Swimming

Lifeboat If Needed

Kastelholm Castle

Ålands only castle, Kastelholm has been around since the medieval period with its heyday coming during the reign of the Swedish King, Gustav Vasa.  At just €6 each to enter we headed in to see what all the fuss was about. First mentioned in writing in 1388, Kastelholm was strategically situated in what was once the middle of the Kingdom of Sweden.  At that time Sweden extended to present-day Russia and the waterways united the realm.  The landscape has changed somewhat in the 700-odd years since then.  From the start, the castle was completely surrounded by water and was naturally sheltered by the Slottsundet’s steep beaches. Towards the end of the 1300’s Kastelholm was a typical fortress with a tower, residence and curtain walls.  Following much rebuilding and extending, the castle ruins today consist of two sections, a higher main castle and a fortification that is surrounded by a curtain wall.

In the 1400s Åland became a castle fief of its own and during the troubled century that followed Kastelholm was also drawn into the war between Sweden and Denmark.  The castle was besieged by the Danes several times but was recaptured by the Swedes in the end. In 1745 a devastating fire broke out that reduced most of the castle to ruins.  Sweden lost Åland and Finland to Russia in 1809 and the centre of power moved to nearby Bomarsund. The most recent restoration was started in 1982 and was completed in 2001.

As with most museums we are visiting over here, the displays are not only visual but interactive and we get to try on some of the clothing and armour the locals used to wear.

We had also heard about the Russian Ruins in Bomarsund so decided to check it out.

The Bomarsund Fortress & Russian Ruins

The biggest military facility that had ever been built in Åland was the Bomarsund fortress. After the war between Sweden and Russia in 1808–1809, Sweden was forced to give up Finland and Åland as part of the peace. Over 2,000 Russian armed forces, fortress workers and convicts lived and worked in Bomarsund.  A whole community developed in the area.  The foundations of the empire-style wooden houses in Nya Skarpans show a small town settlement with a post office, school, shops and offices. The Crimean War of 1853–56 led to the English fleet sailing into the Baltic Sea and attacking targets along the Finnish coast. The most tempting target was the Bomarsund fortress and August 1854 saw the landing of 12,000 English and French soldiers. At the same time about 40 steam-driven warships approached from the south whereas the defences were built to withstand attacks from ships coming from the north.  On 13 August the soldiers went on the offensive at the same time as the warships subjected the fortress to massive gunfire. On 16 August the Russian commander, General Bodisco, capitulated.  Bomarsund was never completed and a few weeks later the fortress was demolished by the victors. The bricks from some areas were kept and put to use – they can be seen in buildings like Uspenski Cathedral and the Alexander Theatre in Helsinki. When the Treaty of Paris was signed in 1856, Sweden pushed through an international convention prohibiting the Russians from fortifying Åland. Since then Åland has been a demilitarised area and Ålander men are not obliged to do national service. Åland belonged to Russia until Finland gained independence in 1917.

We stayed the night beside the ruins of the Notvik Tower which defended the channel approaching Bomarsund.  This took five years to build but just three days for the English to defeat.

Notvik Tower Ruins

Strategic Position for The Guns

Notvik – a Perfect Position for Defending the Channel

Bomarsund Fortress – How it Looked

Bomarsund Today

The Locals

The locals are all so friendly. On Bjorko island we parked up next to the rubbish recycling ‘house’ and found it’s a great way to meet the locals. That evening we were invited to watch the sunset over the water while drinking French liquor and soaking up the last of the day’s warmth from the smooth granite rocks.

Stunning Private Sunset

Meeting The Locals

What To Bring to Åland

I would recommend stocking up on your favourite groceries before coming across as some of the prices are on the tad expensive side.  The cauliflower was €4.40 each and one wasn’t much larger than my hand.  Coffee can set you back over €10 with a packet of biscuits just under €4. There is usually a store on the bigger islands but don’t expect to find a dairy at every corner. It’s remote here which adds to the charm. Looking around we see many of the locals tending to their own vegetable patch.

Would We Recommend A Visit To the Åland Islands?

If you have the time while heading between Sweden and Finland, and you are happy to enjoy a few peaceful days, then certainly make sure you take the opportunity to slow down a wee bit and meander your way across.  There’s no need to take twelve days like we did, however, we have no regrets.   The locals are friendly, so make sure you engage them and ask a little about how life on the island suits them and their family.  You are bound to be richly rewarded with their stories.

Aland Reflections

Once Loved House

Cafe & Shop on Brändö

Table With A View

Motorhome Facilities And Stopping Places

Water was relatively easy to find on most of the islands, however I recommend you taste this first.  On two occasions the water was brownish and tasted ‘dirty’ – we drink straight from our tank so didn’t fill up there.  Nevertheless, we were never far from the next island where we would try again.  We filled up at marinas or cemeteries after asking permission first.  We spent a minimum of two nights on each island group that we ferried to and never came close to running out of water.

Each island has its own rubbish collection area, so ridding ourselves of daily rubbish was a piece of cake. Grey water disposal again wasn’t an issue given the number of gravel roads and laybys away from the public.

Mariehamn Marina has facilities for emptying toilet cassettes.  We used biological washing liquid in our cassette which made it environmentally friendly for carefully emptying into the public toilets we found along the way.  Below is a map showing our stopping points.  Click on each of the points to see a photo of where we parked and for more information.

How Finland Reduced Our Gas Consumption Part 1

How Finland Reduced Our Gas Consumption Part 1

For those of you who are seasoned travelers and/or have been to this part of the world in your moho, it may come as no surprise to learn that Finland does NOT have LPG.

We were aware of this fact and filled our Gaslow twin gas bottles up to the brim in Sweden before heading over.

Having lived full time in our moho, Betsy, we really hadn’t considered the need to conserve gas.  After all, it’s cheap enough to buy, it’s relatively easy to find (although Italy did give us some grief) and it lasts quite a while.

We use gas for our fridge and freezer, to heat our water for showers, for warmth when it gets cold (although this isn’t yet needed in Finland), for making tea/coffee, and of course to cook meals.

At what I would consider our usual consumption rate, we would get up to six weeks from our two bottles.  Then we started baking bread every second day and cakes on a regular basis, which took us to about a four-week cycle.

We arrived in Finland but were shocked to notice that after just twelve days, with considered usage, we were one bottle down already.  The weather has been relatively warm which could contribute to greater gas consumption for the fridge/freezer.  So what is considered usage I hear you ask?  We had just stopped baking cakes and bread but continued to cook dinner every night (we eat out infrequently).

We expected to be in Finland for another three or four weeks so it was time to get serious, look at how we were using gas and drastically cut down our usage or we were going to run out and have to make a break for the Swedish border for a refill.  Here’s what we did.

1.              Stopped all baking of yummy, non-essential food, ie bread, cakes, etc and bought bread a couple of times a week and a cake now and again instead.

2.              Purchased a low wattage (1000W) electric jug.  We have two solar panels and a large inverter, so by swapping from a stovetop gas kettle to an electric jug (when the batteries are well charged) has made a huge difference to how long we have the gas running every day.  We have reduced our tea consumption, which can’t be a bad thing.  The jug is also used for boiling water for washing the dishes, which we usually save for the morning when the sun is up so the batteries can maintain a higher charge.

3.              Monitored the hot water system for showers.  In the past, we would turn on the switch to heat the gas then forget it for half an hour or an hour before jumping into the shower and leaving it on until the second person had finished.  Now we set the timer for 20 minutes, the heater is turned off and both showers taken quickly while the water is hot.  We have found there is ample hot water for two satisfactory showers and we may experiment with reducing the heat time to 15 minutes.

4.              After we both have showers the residual hot water is sometimes used to wash the dishes, hence making the most from the gas heated water.  Previously we would just boil the kettle for the dishes.

5.              Reduce our shower time (I know this sounds obvious, but I really like to stand under hot water and contemplate the world).  Now I contemplate it quickly when drying off.  However, our shower routine has typically been to get wet, turn the shower off, lather up with soap and shampoo, then turn the water back on, job done.  We have also noticed a reduction in our water usage as a result.

6.              The biggest step we took was to check into a camping ground for a night, which we normally only do when we absolutely have to.   It had to be done, so just for one night we bit the bullet, paid our money, and then made the most of this resource.  We arrived at 11am and set about in the kitchen cooking up meals that we could freeze or chill so we wouldn’t have to cook for a couple of weeks.  This took the rest of the day and part of the next day.  Thankfully the camping ground had a 3pm checkout time.

We made nacho mince, (2x meals); Swedish meatballs (2x meals); Caponata (yummy on bread for meze type meals), Aubergine rolls (3 x meals); Beef and Guinness pie (3 x meals); honey-soy chicken wings (1x meal); Thai Chicken Curry (2 x meals); and our famous lemon cake.  Then we had to cool everything down and pack it neatly into our fridge and freezer.  To read more click here for the full lowdown.

7.              We have a microwave oven that will allow us to heat our pre-made meals up in no time, reducing our gas consumption.  We will just use the gas for cooking up fresh vegetables for the evening meal.

8.              Of course, while we were in the camping ground we plugged into the power (to give the fridge a break from using gas) and also used the campground’s showers.  That’s something I wouldn’t usually do even if we do find ourselves in a camping ground.

9.              We turned the temperature of the fridge up (warmer) one notch so it would use less gas.  Everything is still frozen and cold as it should be so that seems okay.

 

At this stage, we don’t know how well our efforts will be rewarded, but we are hoping to stay in Finland for up to four more weeks so fingers crossed.  We believe that we have cut our usage by at least 80% which should be more than enough, but time will tell.

I will update this post when the experiment has Finnished (excuse the pun).  If you have any suggestions or recommendations please feel free to share them.  We are keen to learn from others.

To find out what happend, click on Part 2 for the Finale.